Hawaiian Green Turtle Red List Assessment Accepted

We are pleased to report that the Red List Assessment of the Hawaiian subpopulation of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) has been accepted by IUCN. As detailed in our last post, the final assessment of the Hawaiian green turtle concluded a status of Least Concern for this subpopulation. This status is a testament to the decades of collaborative research and conservation in Hawaii that allowed the population to recover, and gives hope to the recovery of depleted marine turtle populations in other parts of the world. The final assessment is available on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species Website (Update: IUCN is currently experiencing technical difficulties with their website. In the meantime you may download the PDF here).

Reference:
Pilcher, N.J., Chaloupka, M.Y. and Woods, E. 2012. Chelonia mydas Hawaiian subpopulation. In: IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.1 <www.iucnredlist.org>.

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5 Responses to Hawaiian Green Turtle Red List Assessment Accepted

  1. terishore says:

    I find this pretty outrageous given that this is clearly part of the WESPAC effort to prematurely delist the green sea turtles for the benefit of the fishing industry; and that WESPAC contractors are the authors of this decision to change the status of the honu at the international level. You slipped this one by the conservation and advocacy community!

    • Teri Shore says:

      I would like to retract my comment above, which I posted too hastily. The Red List Assessment for the Hawaiian green turtle began several years ago, and the assessment (like all IUCN Red List Assessments) underwent extensive peer and public review among the 200-plus members of the MTSG, the MTSG Red List Assessment Committee, as well as IUCN’s Red List experts in Switzerland and the UK. The process is independent and transparent, I understand that the process has no relationship to the Western Pacific Regional Fisheries Managment Council or the petition to the U.S government from the Hawaii Civic Association to remove the honu from U.S. Endangered Species Act protections. I apologize to the MTSG reviewers for the comments above. Clearly the increase of honu populations is an incredible success story for the U.S. Endangered Species Act protections and the sea turtle conservation community.

    • terishore says:

      I would like to retract the comment above and apologize to the MTSG for posting them so hastily. The Red List Assessment for the Hawaiian green turtles began several years ago, and the assessment (like all IUCN Red List Assessments) underwent extensive peer and public review among the 200-plus members of the MTSG, the MTSG Red List Assessment Committee, as well as IUCN’s Red List experts in Switzerland and the UK. It is an independent and transparent process. The process has no relationship to the Western Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Council nor to the petition to the U.S. government to remove the honu from U.S. Endangered Species Act protections by the Hawaii Civic Association, which is currently under review. The new Red List status for the honu is testament to the effectiveness of ESA protections and the committment of the sea turtle conservation community.

  2. Victoria says:

    This is great news! Unfortunatelly, it is impossible to download the assessment, could you repair the link? Thanks!

    • MTSG says:

      Hi Victoria, Apologies for the broken link – IUCN is currently experiencing technical difficulties with the Red List website. In the meantime, we have update the post above to include a link to the PDF of the final assessment as it was submitted.

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